7 Easy Ways to Keep Mosquitos Away

So far, we have yet to meet someone that actually enjoyed the company of mosquitos. Not only are they extremely annoying when you’re trying to peacefully enjoy the great outdoors, mosquitos can harbor deadly viruses and diseases. At DC Mosquito Squad, we pride ourselves in delivering innovative solutions that effectively kill and prevent mosquitos and other pests. While no method is 100 percent guaranteed to prevent and kill off every mosquito, there are several things you can do to prevent mosquitos from nesting in your yard.

1. Wear Mosquito Repellant

One of the simplest methods for keeping the mosquitos at bay is mosquito repellant. The most common form of repellant is DEET, a chemical originally developed by the Army during WWII. Not only does DEET ward off mosquitos, it also helps prevent ticks and fleas from becoming attracted to you.

How does DEET work? It was once thought that DEET worked by “blinding” an insects’ senses so that they could no longer smell you. However, recent research has shown that mosquitos just plain hate the smell (source: PNAS PDF).

Most insect repellants use 30 – 50 percent DEET, giving you protection for 3 – 6 hours. 100 percent DEET is also available.

If you’re like mosquitos and hate the smell of DEET, or you just like to avoid it, several natural repellants are available, like oil of lemon eucalyptus, citronella oil, and castor oil.

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2. Cover up!

This may seem like a no-brainer, but if your skin isn’t exposed, mosquitos can’t bite! If you’re going to a place that’s particularly rampant with mosquitos, consider long, loose fitting clothes, like long pants, a long sleeved shirt, and a hat.


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3. Citronella Candles

Citronella Candles are the classic method for keeping mosquitos away, especially on those hot summer nights. Mosquitos are repelled by the smell, but citronella candles only work on calm, non-windy days, and you have to stay pretty close to them.

4. Remove Standing Water

Mosquitos are very attracted to water and lay their eggs in stagnant water. Keep pools and wheel barrows covered, keep tarps taut or hang them up when not in use, and turn over or remove any objects that can hold water.

A lot of people use rain barrels to harvest beneficial rain water. However, these are prime breeding grounds for mosquitos. An innovative solution is to use Mosquito Dunks – a small tablet that releases Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (BTI), a bacteria that kills mosquito larvae. BTI is harmless to humans, plants, and animals.

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5. Keep Your Yard Tidy

After mating, female mosquitos take shelter under dead leaves, grass, and other debris. When working in your yard, put your yard waste in bags or your compost bin, or shred it ultra-fine and rake it into your flower beds and gardens.

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6. Friendly Mosquito Predators

Certain types of birds, like warblers and tree swallows, bats, and dragonflies all love to snack on mosquitos. You can attract birds with bird feeders and houses.

Attracting dragonflies is a little harder without a natural body of water. However, if your yard has a natural pond or boggy area, you can attract dragonflies by putting stones and shrubs around the area, and by planting cat tails and other water-loving plants. If there isn’t a dragonfly habitat nearby, it can be hard to attract any, so consider buying dragonflies eggs from a specialty garden center or bait shop.

You can attract bats by putting up a bat house in your yard. We know that bats aren’t for everyone, but you have to admit – they’re pretty cool, and they can eat hundreds of mosquitos per hour!

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7. Get Your Yard Treated by DC Mosquito Squad

We can’t waste an opportunity to tell you about our specialty – Treating your yard to kill and prevent mosquitos! We apply a barrier spray that repels and kills mosquitoes for twenty-one days. Contact us at 571-830-8002 or info@dcmosquitosquad.com, or visit our website.

Content on this website is for informational purposes only. We intend for our content to be educational, but we advise all content be used at the reader’s own risk.